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toshikitty:

Can you tell I have given up on life

justkaitoshikithings:

"being set on fire" requested by krs100

04.13.14 ♥ 205
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cfvblahblahblah:

holy shit

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NO.

— Kai Toshiki (via azatoi-flore)

cfv, .
04.13.14 ♥ 106

lyrie-tsu:

That’s it.

That’s the episode.

04.13.14 ♥ 28
Stand Up LE Vanguard!

— Olivier Gailard being a fucking meme  (via astromagician)

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darkmagiciangirlo3o:

I totally didn’t replay this part like 5 times

04.13.14 ♥ 48

galaxyeyedrops:

Okay, continuing from my other post about French Arthurian themes.

As said before, Percival didn’t exist in the first Celtic myths. He was an original character, if you will, by the French writer Chretien de Troyes and adapted elsewhere after that.

The first story he appears in is le Conte du Graal (also known as Perceval, the Story of the Grail). The Grail was later referred to as the Holy Grail in several continuations of this story (the original work was unfinished) and was in possession of the Wounded King, the Fisher King whom I’ve already compared to Aichi (originally the Fisher King and Wounded King were the same person but later stories began to distinguish them as separate characters).

Percival, at the beginning, fails to ask the question that would heal the King and restore his kingdom. After discovering it, he seeks to re-enter the Fisher King’s domain to truly heal him.

The original story is unfinished, but the numerous continuations have ended with Percival healing the Fisher King to ascending to his throne as his successor upon his death (something I find that resonates with how Gaillard picked up the Liberator sub-clan).

The French stories in general, especially the Vulgate Cycle, have a Christian bent to them. If we forget the idea of the Holy Grail being a part of these mythos whatsoever, there were several background changes, most noticeably Merlin’s, who became a son of a demon who was baptized and kept the powers in the name of God.

There’s no shortage of religious symbolism with Gaillard here, with his Judgement at the end comparable to the fires of Hell, as he explicitly mentions punishing the sinner.

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